Category Archives: Analysis

“Making Available”– The Supreme Court Rules That There Is Only One Royalty Fee To Be Paid

picture of the the entrance of the Supreme Court of Canada, or Cour Supreme du Canada, in Ottawa. The Supreme Court of Canada is the highest court of Canada, the final court of appeals in the Canadian justice system. Its decisions are the ultimate expression and application of Canadian law and binding upon all lower courts of Canada

Fasken successfully represented several of the respondents before the Supreme Court of Canada in Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada v. Entertainment Software Association, 2022 SCC 30. In its recent decision, the Supreme Court conclusively rejected attempts by SOCAN to “double dip” on copyright royalties via the making available of copyrighted works and in the process helped clarify a number of important legal issues. Some of these issues are unique to copyright law, while others have broader relevance, including issues related to determining the standard of review post-Vavilov and how treaties should be used to interpret statutes.

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Trademark Protection within Blockchain Domains

Block chain concept. Big data binary code futuristic information technology, data flow. Transferring of big data. interconnected blocks of data depicting a cryptocurrency blockchain . 3D Rendering.

Companies owning trademarks should reserve their trademarks with blockchain naming systems. The risk of infringement of blockchain domain names is real and remedies are limited at this time. Thus, it becomes essential to protect the intellectual property rights of companies preventively within the blockchain ecosystem.

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Bill 96: Major Changes Affecting Trademarks on Packaging and Signage in Canada

Close-up on a blue Open sign in a window with written in it in English & French.

Most companies doing business in Canada prefer to use the same branding across all Provinces and Territories, particularly for consumer product labelling and signage of consumer-facing businesses. This means that Quebec’s language law often defines how brands are presented across Canada. With new legislation adopted on May 25, 2022 (Bill 96), the Charter of the French Language is now much less favourable to trademark owners.

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